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prostheticknowledge:

Bear On Stairs

Stop-motion looping animation by DBLG uses 3D printing to create models for each frame of a bear climbing stairs - video embedded below:

DBLG’s in-house studio projects are a platform for us to experiment with creative ideas and above all have fun. For The Stairs Project we wanted to explore the use of stop frame animation with 3D printing.

More at DBLG here

prostheticknowledge:

Watch Your Privacy

Augmented Reality app for Google Glass by Sander Veenhof will let you know where there are surveillance cameras in public spaces - video embedded below:

Google Glass a privacy problem? It can also be the solution for those worried about with privacy: buy a Google Glass!

Use this handy augmented reality app that visualises nearby privacy intrusions, based on open data about surveillance cameras worldwide (And it accurately maps your fellow Google Glass users too!)

More Here

new-aesthetic:

Beyond Verbal, Others Use Voice Analysis to Assess Emotions - WSJ.com

TEL AVIV—Beyond Verbal Communications Ltd., a voice-recognition software developer here, is rolling out an app promising something Siri can’t yet deliver: a readout on how you’re feeling. Called Moodies, it lets a smartphone user speak a few words into the phone’s mike to produce, about 20 seconds later, an emotional analysis. Beyond Verbal executives say the app is mostly for self-diagnosis—and a bit of fun: It pairs a cartoon face with each analysis, and users can share the face on Facebook or in a tweet or email. But the app is coming out as the company and other developers—many clustered in Tel Aviv—push increasingly sophisticated hardware and software they say can determine a person’s emotional state through analysis of his or her voice. These companies say the tools can also detect fraud, screen airline passengers and help a call-center technician better deal with an irate customer. And they can be used to keep tabs on employees or screen job applicants. One developer, Tel Aviv-based Nemesysco Ltd., offers what it calls “honesty maintenance” software aimed at human-resource executives. The firm says that by analyzing a job applicant’s voice during an interview, the program can help identify fibs. That’s raising alarm among many voice-analysis experts, who question the accuracy of such on-the-spot interpretations. It’s also raising worries among privacy advocates, who say such technology—especially if it is being rolled out in cheap, easy-to-use smartphone apps—could be a fresh threat to privacy in the digital age.

new-aesthetic:

Beyond Verbal, Others Use Voice Analysis to Assess Emotions - WSJ.com

TEL AVIV—Beyond Verbal Communications Ltd., a voice-recognition software developer here, is rolling out an app promising something Siri can’t yet deliver: a readout on how you’re feeling. Called Moodies, it lets a smartphone user speak a few words into the phone’s mike to produce, about 20 seconds later, an emotional analysis. Beyond Verbal executives say the app is mostly for self-diagnosis—and a bit of fun: It pairs a cartoon face with each analysis, and users can share the face on Facebook or in a tweet or email. But the app is coming out as the company and other developers—many clustered in Tel Aviv—push increasingly sophisticated hardware and software they say can determine a person’s emotional state through analysis of his or her voice. These companies say the tools can also detect fraud, screen airline passengers and help a call-center technician better deal with an irate customer. And they can be used to keep tabs on employees or screen job applicants. One developer, Tel Aviv-based Nemesysco Ltd., offers what it calls “honesty maintenance” software aimed at human-resource executives. The firm says that by analyzing a job applicant’s voice during an interview, the program can help identify fibs. That’s raising alarm among many voice-analysis experts, who question the accuracy of such on-the-spot interpretations. It’s also raising worries among privacy advocates, who say such technology—especially if it is being rolled out in cheap, easy-to-use smartphone apps—could be a fresh threat to privacy in the digital age.